Flewellen presenting on Community Archaeology and Capacity Building at the 2017 annual American Anthropologists Association conference. Photo taken by Dr. Justin Dunnavant

Flewellen presenting on Community Archaeology and Capacity Building at the 2017 annual American Anthropologists Association conference. Photo taken by Dr. Justin Dunnavant

Research Interests

As a scholar of anthropology and African and African diaspora studies, Flewellen's intellectual genealogy is shaped by critical theory rooted in Black feminist epistemology and pedagogy. This epistemological backdrop not only constructs the way she designs, conducts and produces her scholarship but acts as foundational to how she advocates for greater diversity within the field of archaeology and within the broader scope of academia. What this has looked like in practice is Flewellen aiding in the founding of the Society of Black Archaeologists, creating a community-engaged sustainable research project, and directing an award-winning archaeology field school dedicated to training underrepresented students in archaeology and heritage studies.

 
 
 Dr. Flewellen with Estate Little Princess Field School participant during the 2017 field season. Photo taken by Dr. Alicia Odewale.

Dr. Flewellen with Estate Little Princess Field School participant during the 2017 field season. Photo taken by Dr. Alicia Odewale.

Black Feminist Archaeology

The theoretical framework that guides Flewellen's research is Kimberlé Crenshaw’s (1991) theorization of intersectionality, which locates the positionality of Black women at the intersections of race, gender and class operations of power and oppression. Intersectionality is the crux of Black feminist theory.

Black feminist theory within archaeological research is fairly new – only a little over a decade old (Franklin 2001; Battle-Baptiste 2011). Although intersectionality has not made substantial inroads within the field of historical archaeology, where it is seen most clearly is in Black feminist archaeological scholarship. A small group of archaeologists, primarily Black women, began asking how the application of Black feminist thought could aid in the interpretation of African American past lived experiences in ways that did not compartmentalize multiple facets of Black women’s experiences but rather interpreted them as wholly complex (Franklin 2001; Battle-Baptist 2011; Agbe-Davies 2001, 2007; see also Wilkie 2003, 2004).

Through Flewellen's implementation of a Black feminist framework, her scholarship ask how race, gender, and class shaped sartorial practices of self-making among members of the  African Diaspora from enslavement through emancipation. 

 
 Dr. Flewellen with Estate Little Princess Field School participant during the 2017 field season. Photo taken by Dr. Alicia Odewale.

Dr. Flewellen with Estate Little Princess Field School participant during the 2017 field season. Photo taken by Dr. Alicia Odewale.

Sustainable Archaeology

Flewellen is currently developing a multi-year sustainable archaeology project in St. Croix, USVI in collaboration with The Slave Wrecks Project (SWP) - a global change program comprised of an international network of institutions and individual associates that investigate the global history and enduring legacies of the African Slave Trade, administered by George Washington University and the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture – as well as the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI), and Diving with a Purpose (DWP), an underwater archaeology advocacy group. 

The project hastwo intended functions: 1.) the development of a long-term research agenda that employs a landscape approach – inclusive of both maritime and terrestrial landscapes – to the study of slavery and emancipation in St. Croix, and 2.) the training of UVI and Crucian youth in scuba diving as well as maritime and terrestrial archaeological methodologies.The project - centered on the Atlantic slave trade - involves simultaneous maritime, terrestrial, and oral historical research projects as well as training in scuba diving and archaeological methods. 

As the Principal Investigator of the terrestrial archaeology component of the project, Flewellen explores Afro-Crucian identity formations from slavery into emancipation (1738-1960s) by analyzin the built and natural environment, gendered placemaking, and memory, as well as conducting a multiscale social analysis of house, community, and society. 

 
 Flewellen's work can be found in the Special Issue of Historical Archaeology entitled, "Challenging Theories of Racism, Diaspora, and Agency in African America."

Flewellen's work can be found in the Special Issue of Historical Archaeology entitled, "Challenging Theories of Racism, Diaspora, and Agency in African America."

Representations of Slavery

Flewellen's master’s thesis work at the National Park Service (NPS) Site Kingsley Plantation, which is located off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida, examined the lived experiences of Black women at the site during enslavement and present-day representations, presented by the NPS, of those racial and gendered histories to the public. This work resulted in a publication in Historical Archaeology entitled “Locating Marginalized Historical Narratives at Kingsley Plantation.”